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I Was Kicked Out Of The Examination Room!

This week Tereya had a doctor's appointment. Two years ago we crossed a new milestone.Every time I accompany my oldest daughter to her doctor's appointment I am reminded of the moment when her physician asked me to leave the examination room.  I remember it like it was yesterday. After entering the examination room, the Registered Nurse (RN) asked Tereya and me how we were doing. We replied we are doing well.

The nurse proceeded to take and record her vital signs (vs)--weight, height, and blood pressure. Shortly after, the Pediatrician entered the room. We engaged in a brief conversation before he provided a comparison of last year's vital signs and this year's vital signs. He stated, "She has maintained her blood pressure and weight which is wonderful". He stated, "It is very hard for many to do whether they are young or old".  He then he said, "Now it is time for you to wait in the waiting room".

I was shocked and in disbelief. My response was "Why do I have to wait in the waiting room? He went on to say that she is at the age where she may have some private issues that she would like to discuss with me, in private. I replied, "She is only 13 years old. I remember my mother being in the doctor's office with me until I was 17 years old. He said, "I know, but that was then and this is now. It's the law. You also know, that whatever we discuss I cannot discuss it with you unless she gives me permission to do so. As I sat in the waiting room, I wondered what they could possibly be discussing. I knew they would discuss topics such as education, sex, drugs, alcohol, school and extracurricular activities. However, I wanted to know specific questions.
               via bococaland.com

Before we left the office he informed me that once Nyasia turns 10, I will no longer be able to access her electronic medical records (emr) via their portal. I will have to go to the medical records department present my ID, prove parental status and then request the records. I quickly replied, "Are you kidding me"? Does she pay for her insurance? He laughed and said I did not want you to be surprised. So I decided to tell you today. I understand why they feel this is necessary, but it is such an inconvenience.

When Tereya and I left the doctor's office I asked her and her response was "stuff". She proceeded to say, "That's between me and the doctor". Eventually she told me that she gave the doctor permission to tell me what they discussed. I told her thank you, but I trust that if it was something serious, I hope you would feel comfortable enough to tell me yourself.

I love my both my girls so much. I realize she is growing up and she has to learn to do things for and by herself.

Do you recall the first time your child's pediatrician asked you to leave the room? How did you feel? What was your reaction?

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